Anderson B. Mayfield, Ph.D.

Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation postdoctoral research fellow
http://coralreefdiagnostics.com
National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, 2 Houwan Rd., Checheng, Pingtung 944, Taiwan
Email: andersonblairmayfield@gmail.com
Telephone: 01-(337)-501-1976

Education
University of Hawaii, Manoa, Department of Zoology, Honolulu, Hawaii. Ph.D., Zoology. Fall 2009.
Supervisor: Dr. Ruth D. Gates, University of Hawaii, Manoa/Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
University of Hawaii, Manoa, Department of Zoology, Honolulu, Hawaii. M.S., Zoology. Fall 2007.
Supervisor: Dr. Ruth D. Gates, University of Hawaii, Manoa/Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. B.S., Biology. Fall 2003. GPA: 3.8/4.0 (magna cum laude)
James Cook University, Townsville, Australia (study abroad). Fall 2003.
Bermuda Institute of Oceans Sciences, Bermuda (study abroad). Spring 2003.
Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, North Carolina. Spring 2003.
Financed 100% of undergraduate education through employment and early graduation.

Postdoctoral research experience
Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (LOF), postdoctoral researcher, Jan. 2013-present.
Conducted research aboard the Golden Shadow as part of the LOF “Global Reef Expedition” to
1) understand the molecular basis of the coral stress response and 2) develop molecular
diagnostic tools for assessing reef coral health.
National Science Foundation (NSF) international postdoctoral research fellowship (OISE-
0852960), National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium (NMMBA), Checheng,
Taiwan, postdoctoral researcher, Feb. 2010-Dec. 2012. Investigated the physiological and subcellular
impacts of climate change on reef-building corals.
NSF grant OCE 04-17412 to Peter Edmunds (The Mo’orea Coral Reef Long Term Ecological
Research [LTER] program), Mo’orea, French Polynesia, postdoctoral researcher, Feb.-Apr.
2011. Investigated the impacts of ocean acidification on reef-building coral larvae.

Master’s and Ph.D. research experience
NSF grant OCE-0752604 to Ruth Gates, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB), Kaneohe,
HI, graduate researcher, Oct. 2008-Jun. 2009. Developed new molecular markers for the coral
endosymbiont Symbiodinium sp.
NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes fellowship, NMMBA, Checheng, Taiwan,
participant, Summer 2008. Conducted research on molecular regulation of coral physiology.
NSF graduate research fellowship, HIMB, Kaneohe, HI, graduate researcher, Fall 2005-Fall 2008.
Developed molecular methodology for reef corals at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology.
Pauley Summer Program, HIMB, Kaneohe, HI, research technician, Summer 2007. Trained foreign
students in coral molecular biology techniques (e.g., DNA/RNA extractions, PCR, and qPCR).
Northwest Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) research cruise, research assistant, Summer 2006. Collected
corals on an HIMB-sponsored NWHI research expedition aboard the NOAA ship Hi’ialakai.

Undergraduate and post-baccalaureate research experience
Centro Ecológico Akumal (NGO), Akumal, Mexico, coral reef ecologist/volunteer, Spring 2004.
Assessed health of coral reefs along the Mayan Riviera, with an emphasis on reefs of Akumal.
Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC, undergraduate research project, Summer 2003.
“Triclosan-induced oxidative stress in the whip coral Leptagorgia virgulata.”
Duke University, Durham, NC, experimental test subject, Winter 2002. Participant in the Divers Alert
Network’s “flying after diving” study at the Duke University hospital’s hyperbaric chamber.

Publications
(44) Mayfield AB, Chen CS (in prep.) Elucidating the molecular cascades underlying coral
thermotolerance using novel proteomic technologies.
(43) Mayfield AB, Wang YB, Chen CS, Chen SH, Lin CY (in prep.) The transcriptomic response to
variable temperature exposure in a common, Indo-Pacific reef coral.
(42) Putnam HP, Mayfield AB, Doo S, Fan TY, Chen CS, Gates RD (in prep.) Physiological and
molecular responses to climate change stressors in the reef coral Pocillopora acuta.
(41) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Dempsey AC (in review) Uncovering environmental parameters driving
variation in the molecular physiology of reef corals: a statistical platform for assessing coral
health in an era of changing global climate. Platax
(40) Chen TY, Hwang GW, Lin HJ, Mayfield AB, Chen CP (in review) The development of a habitat
suitability model for sub-tropical tidal flat fiddler crabs. Wetlands
(39) Rodríguez-Troncoso AP, Rodríguez-Zaragoza FA, Mayfield AB, Cupul-Magaña AL (in review)
Temporal variation in invertebrate recruitment on an Eastern Pacific coral reef. Journal of Sea
Research
(38) Liu PJ, Chang HF, Mayfield AB, Lin HJ (in review) A mesocosm-based approach for assessing
the effects of global climate change on the tropical seagrass Thalassia hemprichii. Journal of
Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
(37) Lin HJ, Lee CL, Peng SE, Hung MC, Liu PJ, Mayfield AB (accepted) Anthropogenic nutrient
enrichment may exacerbate the impacts of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on
intertidal seagrass beds. Global Change Biology
(36) Mayfield AB, Chen YJ, Lu CY, Chen CS (2018) Exploring the environmental physiology of
the Indo-Pacific reef coral Seriatopora hystrix using differential proteomics. The Open Journal
of Marine Science 8, 223-252
(35) Mayfield AB, Chen YJ, Lu CY, Chen CS (2018) The proteomic response of the reef coral
Pocillopora acuta to experimentally elevated temperature. PLoS ONE e0192001
(34) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Dempsey AC (2017) The molecular ecophysiology of closely related
pocilloporid corals of New Caledonia. Platax 14, 1-45
(33) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Dempsey AC. (2017) Biomarker profiling in reef corals of Tonga’s
Ha’apai and Vava’u Archipelagos. PLoS ONE e0185857
(32) Chen HK, Mayfield AB, Wang LH, Chen CS (2017) Coral lipid bodies as the relay center
interconnecting diel-dependent lipidomic changes in different cellular compartments. Scientific
Reports 7, 3244
(31) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Dempsey AC. (2017) Identifying corals displaying aberrant behavior
in Fiji’s Lau Archipelago. PLoS ONE e0177267
(30) Chen TY, Hwang GW, Mayfield AB, Chen CP, Lin HJ (2017) The relationship between
intertidal soil composition and fiddler crab burrow depth. Environmental Engineering 100,
256-260
(29) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Dempsey AC, Bruckner AW (2016) The molecular ecophysiology of
closely related pocilloporids from the South Pacific: a case study from the Austral and Cook
Islands. Platax 13, 1-25
(28) Mayfield AB, Wang YB, Chen CS, Chen SH, Lin CY (2016) Dual-compartmental
transcriptomic+proteomic analysis of a marine endosymbiosis exposed to environmental
change. Molecular Ecology 25, 5944-5958
(27) Cheng YR, Meng PJ, Mayfield AB, Dai CF (2016) Copepods associated with scleractinian
corals: a worldwide checklist and a case study of their impact on the reef-building coral
Pocillopora damicornis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pocilloporidae). Zootaxa 4174(1): 291-345
(26) Tortolero-Langarica JJA, Cupul-Magaña AL, Carricart-Ganivet JP, Mayfield AB, Rodriguez-
Troncoso AP (2016). Changes in growth and calcification rates in the reef-building coral
Porites lobata: the implications of morphotype and gender on coral growth. Frontiers in
Marine Science 3(179)
(25) Mayfield AB (2016) Uncovering spatio-temporal and treatment-derived differences in the
molecular physiology of a model coral-dinoflagellate mutualism with multivariate
statistical approaches. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 4:63
(24) Chen WNU, Hsiao YJ, Mayfield AB, Young R, Hsu L, Chen CS, Peng SE (2016) Vertical
transmission of heterologous clade C Symbiodinium in a model anemone infection system.
Peer J 4:e2358
(23) Mayfield AB, Chen YJ, Lu CY, Chen CS (2016) Proteins responsive to variable temperature
exposure in the reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix. Coral Reefs: Ecosystems,
Environmental Impact and Current Threats. Ed. S. Ortiz, NOVA Publishing, New York. 1-72
(22) Mayfield AB, Bruckner AW, Chen CH, Chen CS (2015) A survey of pocilloporids and their
endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities in the Austral and Cook Islands of the South
Pacific. Platax 12: 1-17
(21) Chen HK, Song SN, Wang LH, Mayfield AB, Chen YJ, Chen WNU, Chen CS (2015) A
compartmental comparison of major lipid species in a coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis:
evidence that the coral host regulates lipogenesis of its cytosolic lipid bodies. PLoS ONE 10(7):
e0132519
(20) Mayfield AB, Wang YB, Chen CS, Chen SH, Lin CY (2014) Compartment-specific
transcriptomics in a reef-building coral exposed to elevated temperatures. Molecular Ecology
23: 5816-5830
(19) Mayfield AB, Chen CS, Liu PJ (2014) Decreased green fluorescent protein-like chromoprotein
gene expression in specimens of the reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis undergoing
high temperature-induced bleaching. Platax 11: 1-23
(18) Mayfield AB, Chen YH, Dai CF, Chen CS (2014) The effects of temperature on gene
expression in the Indo-Pacific reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix: insight from
aquarium studies in Southern Taiwan. International Journal of Marine Science 4(50): 1-23
(17) Mayfield AB, Hsiao YY, Chen HK, Chen CS (2014) Rubisco expression in the dinoflagellate
Symbiodinium sp. is influenced by both photoperiod and endosymbiotic lifestyle. Marine
Biotechnology 16: 371-384
(16) Doo SS, Mayfield AB, Nguyen HD, Chen HK (2014) Protein analysis in large benthic
foraminifera. Invited book chapter in: Approaches to Study Living Foraminifera. Editors:
Hiroshi Kitazato and Joan Bernhard. Pp. 71-89
(15) Mayfield AB, Fan TY, Chen CS (2013) Real-time PCR-based gene expression analysis in the
model reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis: insight from a salinity stress study. Platax
10: 1-29
(14) Mayfield AB, Fan TY, Chen CS (2013) Physiological acclimation to elevated temperature in a
reef-building coral from an upwelling environment. Coral Reefs 32: 909-921
(13) Mayfield AB, Fan TY, Chen CS (2013) The physiological impact of ex situ transplantation on
the Taiwanese reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix. Journal of Marine Biology Article ID
569369
(12) Wang LH, Lee HH, Fang LS, Mayfield AB, Chen CS (2013) Normal fatty acid and phospholipid
synthesis are prerequisites for the cell cycle of Symbiodinium and their endosymbiosis with sea
anemones. PLoS ONE e72486
(11) Putnam HP, Mayfield AB, Fan TY, Chen CS, Gates RD (2013) The physiological and molecular
responses of larvae from the reef-building coral Pocillopora damicornis exposed to near-future
increases in temperature and pCO2. Marine Biology 160: 2157-2173
(10) Mayfield AB, Chen M, Meng PJ, Lin HJ, Chen CS, Liu PJ (2013) The physiological response of
the reef coral Pocillopora damicornis to elevated temperature: results from coral reef mesocosm
experiments in Southern Taiwan. Marine Environmental Research 86: 1-11
(9) Mayfield AB, Hsiao, YY, Fan TY, Chen CS (2012) Temporal variation in RNA/DNA and
protein/DNA ratios in four anthozoan-dinoflagellate endosymbioses of the Indo-Pacific:
implications for molecular diagnostics. Platax 9: 1-24
(8) Mayfield AB, Chan PH, Putnam HP, Chen CS, Fan TY (2012) The effects of a variable
temperature regime on the physiology of the reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix: results
from a laboratory-based reciprocal transplant. The Journal of Experimental Biology 215: 4183-
4195
(7) Doo SS, Mayfield AB, Byrne M, Chen HK, Nguyen H, Fan TY (2012) Reduced expression of the
rate-limiting carbon fixation enzyme RuBisCO in the benthic foraminifer Baculogypsina
sphaerulata holobiont in response to heat shock. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and
Ecology 430-431: 63-67
(6) Chen WNU, Kang HJ, Weis VM, Mayfield AB, Fang LS Chen CS (2012) Diel rhythmicity of lipid
body formation in a coral-Symbiodinium endosymbiosis. Coral Reefs 31: 521-534
(5) Mayfield AB, Wang LH, Tang PC, Hsiao YY, Fan TY, Tsai CL, Chen CS (2011) Assessing the
impacts of experimentally elevated temperature on the biological composition and molecular
chaperone gene expression of a reef coral. PLoS ONE e26529
(4) Peng SE, Chen WNU, Chen HK, Lu CY, Mayfield AB, Fang LS, Chen CS (2011) Lipid bodies in
coral-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis: ultrastructural and proteomic analyses. Proteomics 17:
3540-3455
(3) Mayfield AB, Hsiao YY, Fan TY, Chen CS, Gates RD (2010) Evaluating the temporal stability of
stress-activated protein kinase and cytoskeleton gene expression in the Pacific corals
Pocillopora damicornis and Seriatopora hystrix. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and
Ecology 395: 215-222
(2) Mayfield AB, Hirst MB, Gates RD (2009) Gene expression normalization in a dual-compartment
system: a real-time PCR protocol for symbiotic anthozoans. Molecular Ecology Resources 9:
462-470
(1) Mayfield AB, Gates RD (2007) Osmoregulation in anthozoan-dinoflagellate symbiosis.
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A: Molecular and Integrative Physiology 147: 1-10

Presentations
(37) Pattimura University, Ambon, Moluccas, Indonesia, invited speaker. Apr. 2018. “Reef coral
health assessment in the Indo-Pacific: the development of biotechnological tools for gauging
coral sensitivity to climate change.”
(36) I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, invited speaker. Apr. 2018: “Reef coral health
assessment in the Indo-Pacific.”
(35) Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA, invited speaker. Nov. 2016. “An introduction to
coral reefs: microbiology, threats, and diagnostics.”
(34) University of the Philippines, Los Baños, Philippines, invited speaker. Oct. 2016. “Reef coral
health assessment in the South Pacific: preliminary results from Fiji’s Lau Archipelago.”
(33) The Omics in the Ocean: 7th International Symposium for Marine Biology and
Biotechnology, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker. Sept. 2015. “Proteins involved in
acclimation to a variable temperature regime in the reef coral Seriatopora hystrix.”
(32) Asia Pacific Coral Reef Symposium, Kenting, Taiwan, oral presentation, July 2014. “Exploring
the genetic basis of thermotolerance in the model reef coral Pocillopora damicornis: an RNASeq
approach.”
(31) National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, invited speaker, May 2014. “Reef coral health
assessment in the South Pacific: the “Global Reef Expedition.”
(30) I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, invited speaker, Feb. 2014. “Coral reef health
assessment in the Indo-Pacific: the Global Reef Expedition.”
(29) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker, Feb.
2014. “Coral health assessment in the Indo-Pacific: the Global Reef Expedition.”
(28) American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting, New Orleans, LA, poster, Dec. 2013.
“Molecular diagnostics and reef-building coral health assessment: can biomarkers be utilized
with confidence in the absence of their functional characterization?”
(27) Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL, invited speaker, Mar. 2013. “Physiological acclimation
to elevated temperatures in a reef-building coral from an upwelling environment.”
(26) National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, invited speaker, Mar. 2013.
“Physiological acclimation to elevated temperatures in a reef-building coral from an upwelling
environment.”
(25) City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, invited speaker, Jan. 2013. “The complex
physiological response of two life history stages of the model reef coral Pocillopora
damicornis exposed to climate change simulations.”
(24) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec.
2012. “Taiwan’s coral reef biodiversity: threats and diagnostics in an era of global climate
change.”
(23) Hengchun Community College, Hengchun, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec. 2012. “Taiwan’s
coral reef biodiversity: threats and diagnostics in an era of global climate change.”
(22) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec.
2012. “Physiological acclimation to elevated temperature in Pocillopora damicornis
specimens from an upwelling reef.”
(21) Mindao University, Beidou, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec. 2012. “Taiwan’s coral reef
biodiversity: threats and diagnostics in a time of global climate change.”
(20) Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec. 2012. “The complex physiological
response of two life history stages of the model reef coral Pocillopora damicornis exposed to
climate change simulations.”
(19) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker, Feb.
2012. “The physiological response of reef corals exposed to climate change simulations.”
(18) Hengchun Community College, Hengchun, Taiwan, invited speaker, Nov. 2011. “An
introduction to Taiwan’s coral reefs: biodiversity and threats in a changing climate.
(17) Mindao University, Beidou, Taiwan, invited speaker, Oct. 2011. “An introduction to Taiwan’s
coral reef inhabitants: threats and diagnostics in a changing climate.”
(16) The Omics in the Ocean: 3rd International Symposium for Marine Biology and
Biotechnology, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker. Sept. 2011. “Coral health diagnostics in a
changing ocean: assessing the physiological response of reef-building pocilloporids to global
climate change scenarios.”
(15) National Cheng-Chi University, Taipei, Taiwan, invited speaker, July 2011. “An Introduction to
Taiwan’s marine biodiversity.”
(14) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker,
April 2011. “Conveying scientific discoveries in the English language.”
(13) University of Louisiana, Lafayette, invited speaker, Jan. 2010. “Understanding the physiological
impacts of global climate change on reef-building corals of Taiwan.”
(12) Mindao University, Changhua, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec. 2010. “An introduction to
Taiwan’s coral reefs: threats and diagnostics in a changing climate.”
(11) National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan, invited speaker, Dec. 2010. “An introduction to
Taiwan’s coral reefs.”
(10) 25th Symposium on Natural Products, Checheng, Taiwan, poster, Nov. 2010. “Sub-cellular
mechanisms of acclimation to altered temperature regimes in the coral Seriatopora hystrix.”
(9) National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, invited speaker,
Nov. 2010. “Investigating the sub-cellular impacts of global climate change on the reefbuilding
corals of Taiwan.”
(8) Marine Environmental and Biodiversity Conservation in the South China Sea, Kaohsiung,
Taiwan, talk, Jul. 2010. “The search for physiologically relevant biomarkers for coral health
assessment: two case studies from pocilloporids exposed to acute temperature increases.”
(7) Asia Pacific Coral Reef Symposium, Phuket, Thailand, talk, Jun. 2010. “Absence of a molecular
chaperone response in Seriatopora hystrix colonies exposed to an acute thermal perturbation.”
(6) Moorea Coral Reef Long-Term Ecological Research annual meeting, Santa Barbara, CA, talk,
Nov. 2009. “Using functional genomics to understand the biology of reef corals.”
(5) “Responses of Coral Holobionts Under Impact of Climate Change” Conference, Taipei,
Taiwan, poster, Jun. 2009. “Diel variation in cytoskeleton gene expression in the reef coral
Seriatopora hystrix: evidence for dynamic changes in cell volume resulting from
photosynthesis.”
(4) Marine Biotechnology Conference, Checheng, Taiwan, poster, Sept. 2008. “Diel variation in cell
volume gene expression in the reef-building coral Seriatopora hystrix.”
(3) Tester Symposium, Honolulu, HI, talk, Mar. 2007. “Osmoregulation in the coral-algal
symbiosis.”
(2) Symbiosis cell biology workshop, Heron Island, Australia, poster, Jan. 2007. “Osmoregulation in
coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis.”
(1) Tester Symposium, Honolulu, HI, poster, Mar. 2006. “Osmoregulation in coral-dinoflagellate
endosymbiosis.”

Research awards (total research awards: $595,600 USD)
US National Research Council-in review. $105,000 to work with scientists at NOAA’s Atlantic
Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory on the development of a “coral stress test” (co-
PI=Dr. Derek Manzello)
Company of Biologists (travel fellowship)-in review. $3,500 to uncover the molecular basis of coral
bleaching in the Philippines.
Fulbright Global Scholar program (US Department of State)-in review. $21,000 to develop a
“coral stress test” in Taiwan to be employed in the field in the Philippines.
European Union’s Marie Curie actions-in review. $100,000 to carry out a two-year research
project on Red Sea coral physiology and molecular biomarker development at the
Interuniversity Institute for Marine Science in Eilat, Israel (co-PI=Dr. Maoz Fine).
National Geographic Society “Explorers” grant-in review. $30,000 to develop a bleaching
susceptibility index for proactive coral reef health assessment in the Philippines.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science-Apr. 2015. $114,000 to conduct Japan-based coral reef
research, with an emphasis on global climate change. Co-PI=Dr. Saki Harii. *Declined funds.
Living Oceans Foundation-Nov. 2012. $300,000 to conduct biomarker-based coral reef surveys.
NSF MCR-LTER-Feb. 2010. $14,000 to study the impacts of ocean acidification on coral health.
PADI Project Aware-Jun. 2009. $1,200 for Taiwan-based research on the coral heat stress response.
NSF International Postdoctoral Fellowship- Jun. 2009. $126,500 for Taiwan-based coral research.
Company of Biologists travel fellowship- Sept. 2008. $1,800 for Taiwan-based coral research.
NSF EAPSI Fellowship- May 2008. $7,500 for Taiwan-based coral reef research.
Edmondson Fund- Apr. 2008. $900 for coral osmoregulation research.
PADI Project Aware- Mar. 2008. $1,000 for coral gene expression normalization study.
PADI Foundation- Apr. 2007. $4,000 for coral gene expression normalization study.
Edmondson Fund- Dec. 2006. $800 for coral stress gene transcription experiments.
PADI Project Aware- Nov. 2006. $1,400 for gene expression experiments on corals.
NSF small travel grant- Sept. 2006. $1,000 for collaborative visit.
NSF Graduate Research Fellowship- Spring 2004. $121,500 for graduate research.

Teaching and volunteer experiences
Coral Reef CPR (NGO), volunteer researcher, 2016-present. I have been working with Coral Reef
CPR to help them establish high-temperature-resilient coral nurseries in the Maldives.
Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (LOF), volunteer researcher, 2016-present. I have
been working with LOF to help them publish and disseminate findings from their “Global Reef
Expedition” in order to aid marine managers in protecting their local coral reefs.
Friendly Bear Editorial Service, president, 2007-present. I have reviewed and edited hundreds of
scientific manuscripts free-of-charge since 2007, as I feel it is my scientific duty to ensure that
excellent science is not rejected by publishers and journals simply due to poor English drafting.
Scientific editing, volunteer reviewer/editor, 2006-present. I have gained a favorable reputation across
numerous journals for my constructive, well written scientific reviews, and I routinely review
and/or edit ~20-30 manuscripts for high-impact scientific journals (e.g., Science) each year.
Duke University, interviewer, 2012-present. I am the local, on-the-ground interviewer for
Taiwanese students wishing to attend my alma mater, Duke University.
Carpe Diem fleet, Maldives, volunteer researcher, Spring-Summer 2017. Trained tourists in coral reef
ecology while helping to remove crown of thorns seastars from local reefs.
Anantara Resorts-Dhigu/Veli & Kihavah, Maldives, volunteer researcher, Winter 2016. Monitored
reefs, sampled corals, and established long-term monitoring sites for two Maldivian resorts.
National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, guest lecturer, Winter
2016. Volunteered to teach college students about marine biology, specifically coral reefs.
National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Taiwan, guest lecturer, Summer
2015. Volunteered to teach elementary school students about marine biology and diving.
Martin Luther King Magnet High School, Nashville, TN, guest lecturer, Spring 2013. Volunteered
to teach high school seniors about coral reef biology and global climate change.
White Creek High School, Nashville, TN, guest lecturer, Fall 2012. Volunteered to teach high school
sophomores about coral reef biology, the scientific method, and tips for excelling academically.
Department of Zoology, UH-Manoa, teaching assistant, Spring 2005. Tuesday laboratory section of
Zoology 430 (animal physiology) assisting Prof. Jonathon Stillman.
Department of Zoology, UH-Manoa, teaching assistant, Fall 2004. Tuesday and Thursday Zoology
101 (introductory zoology) laboratory sections assisting Prof. Steven Robinow.
North Carolina Rural Healthcare Coalition, internship/volunteer, Summer 2002. Worked with
Duke Hospital physicians as part of the MEDS program to provide medication to farmers.
Duke Recycles, environmental manager, Spring-Fall 2002. Coordinated campus recycling efforts.

Leadership and awards
President/Founder- Duke University SCUBA Club, Fall 2002-2003.
Vice President- North Carolina Rural Healthcare Coalition, Spring 2002-Fall 2002.
Community Service Award- (for coordination of football game recycling), Fall 2001-Spring 2002.
Employee of the Quarter- Duke Recycles, Spring 2002.

Professional references and current collaborators
Dr. Andrew Bruckner, andywbruckner@gmail.com, Coral Reef CPR (2nd postdoctoral research
supervisor)
Dr. Chien-Hsun Chen, 09noodle19@gmail.com, Taiwan Ocean Research Institute
Dr. Chii-Shiarng Chen, cchen@nmmba.gov.tw, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium
(1st postdoctoral research supervisor)
Dr. Sophia Chen, sophia@iis.sinica.edu.tw, National Taiwan University/Academia Sinica
Ms. Alex Dempsey, dempsey@LivingOceansFoundation.org, Living Oceans Foundation
Dr. Tung-Yung Fan, tyfan@nmmba.gov.tw, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium
Dr. Ruth Gates, rgates@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii, Manoa (Ph.D. supervisor)
Dr. E. Gordon Grau, grau@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii (Ph.D. committee)
Dr. Gino Limmon, gino.limmon@gmail.com, Pattimura University (Indonesia)
Dr. Chung-Yen Lin, yamatolin@gmail.com, National Taiwan University/Academia Sinica
Dr. Hsin-Juh Lin, hjlin@dragon.nchu.edu.tw, National Chung-Hsing University
Dr. Pi-Jen Liu, pijenliu@nmmba.gov.tw, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium
Dr. Luisa Marcelino, l-marcelino@northwestern.edu, Northwestern University
Dr. Joao Monteiro, jonnas_mac@me.com, University of the Azores
Dr. Jackie Padilla-Gamino, jpgamino@uw.edu, University of Washington
Dr. Shao-En Peng, pengse@nmmba.gov.tw, National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium
Dr. Hollie Putnam, hputnam@uri.edu, University of Rhode Island
Dr. Bernard Riegl, rieglb@nova.edu, Nova Southeastern University
Dr. Alma-Paola Rodriguez-Troncoso, pao.rodriguezt@gmail.com, Universidad de Guadalajara
Dr. Victor Tizcon, ticzonvs@gmail.com, University of the Philippines-Los Banos
Dr. Henry Trapido-Rosenthal, rosenthl@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii (Ph.D. committee)
Dr. Nikki Traylor-Knowles, ntraylorknowles@rsmas.miami.edu, University of Miami
Dr. Yu-Bin Wang, yubin0611@gmail.com, National Taiwan University and Academia Sinica
Dr. Virginia Weis, weisv@science.oregonstate.edu, Oregon State University (Ph.D. committee)

Research interests
Fundamental cell biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbioses: My research interests center
around three predominant themes, all of which involve photosynthetic mutualisms between anthozoans
(namely reef-building corals and sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellates of the genus
Symbiodinium. First, I am interested in how an anthozoan cell modifies it physiology to accommodate
these dinoflagellates, which can occupy nearly the entire volume of their hosts’ gastrodermal cells. I
have utilized molecular, cellular, and physiological approaches to uncover the mechanisms by which
reef-building corals, in particular, modulate their intracellular environments in order to carry out the
myriad biochemical processes they need to survive whilst exploiting only a miniscule cytoplasmic
space within which to function. Such works have been particularly focused on the importance of
osmoregulation and how each member works to establish the osmotic pressure of the coral “holobiont”
(host+symbiont); indeed, I hypothesize that osmoregulation may be the central axis around which the
spectrum of cellular defects elicited by compromised environmental states revolves.
Environmental physiology of coral-dinoflagellate mutualisms: My second interest involves the
response of reef-building corals exposed to changes in their environments, particularly increases in
temperature. During my first postdoctoral research project at Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine
Biology and Aquarium (2010-2012), I utilized molecular and microscopic tools to monitor the subcellular
and cellular responses, respectively, of specimens of the model reef corals Seriatopora hystrix
and Pocillopora damicornis that had been exposed to elevated seawater temperature and acidity (i.e.,
pCO2) over both short- (hours-days) and long-term (weeks-months) timescales. The molecular
approaches included genome-, transcriptome- (e.g., mRNA sequencing with Illumina’s TRU-Seq®
technology), and proteome- (e.g., 2D gels followed by mass spectrometry) scale techniques, and the
microscopic approaches featured light, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. Using
such methodologies, we found that the corals’ responses to elevated temperature are much more
pronounced than their responses to acidified seawater. In fact, neither coral species appears to be
significantly affected by ocean acidification. Although this is good news on the one hand, even small
increases in temperature evoked dramatic, detrimental cellular and physiological responses in both
species, and I am now further exploring their transcriptomes and proteomes to uncover the genes and
proteins, respectively, involved in their stress response for those coral samples that ultimately
bleached, as well as those genes and proteins underlying acclimation in the case of the experiments in
which corals ultimately survived in their artificially manipulated environments. Such data will ideally
allow us to predict how reef-building corals will respond to the higher temperatures and pCO2 levels
that will characterize their abiotic milieu in the coming decades as a result of global climate change.
Development of a “coral stress test:” I have spent over 15 years attempting to develop a “coral stress
test” (CST) in which concentrations of each of a series of analytes (e.g., mRNAs, proteins,
metabolites) are measured in order to rapidly assign a level of health to a sampled colony. This work
has progressed slowly due to a variety of methodological hurdles. First, we had to develop
endosymbiosis-tailored molecular protocols (i.e., how to measure concentrations of cellular analytes
when you have a mix of molecules from two different eukaryotes: host coral and Symbiodinium). Then,
we found that there is no correlation between gene and protein expression in reef corals; although gene
mRNAs could still be used as biomarkers for coral health assessment (described in more detail below),
their expression levels cannot, on the other hand, be used to reconstruct cellular physiology since the
proteins that actually undertake cellular work do not show a corresponding trend. Therefore, if we want
to uncover the cellular pathways responsible for coral acclimation to environmental change, or, in
contrast, their stress response in the cases in which acclimation does not occur, then we need to instead
target their proteomes. I am consequently investing a good portion of my time these days to profiling
the proteomes (rather than only the transcriptomes) of corals of the aforementioned, Taiwan-based
global climate change manipulation experiments.
In addition to these proteomics projects, I have been using the mRNA-level molecular
biomarkers that have emerged from the aforementioned environmental challenge studies in Taiwan to
document the health of >1,000 P. damicornis specimens collected at numerous points along a 4,000-
km transect across the Pacific and Indian Oceans as part of the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans
Foundation’s “Global Reef Expedition,” the largest coral reef survey ever undertaken. However, as an
additional hurdle in the development of the CST, we have yet to have identified an “ideal” biomarker
that is only synthesized by corals that ultimately bleach or become sick. Until such a molecule is
identified in samples of my laboratory-based experiments (amongst other potential means), I have
instead been using advanced mathematics to calculate a level of “normality” for each sampled colony
of the Global Reef Expedition, with the hypothesis being that those colonies that exhibit statistically
aberrant behavior with respect to a suite of molecular-scale response variables (including
Symbiodinium density, RNA/DNA ratio, and expression of eight mRNA biomarkers) will be the ones
that are most likely to be of compromised resilience. Future return visits to sites featuring such
aberrantly behaving coral colonies will allow us to verify the efficacy of this molecular
biomarker+multivariate statistical analysis approach for coral health diagnostics.

SCUBA diving and fieldwork
I have been an avid SCUBA diver for the past 20+ years, logging over 2,500 dives across
Bermuda, the Caribbean (Belize, Bonaire, Costa Rica, Colombia, Florida, Honduras, Mexico,
Nicaragua, and Panama), inland United States (Alabama, North Carolina, and Tennessee), Hawaii,
French Polynesia (Mo’orea and the Austral Islands), the Cook Islands, Fiji, Tonga, New Caledonia,
Solomon Islands, Palau, Australia (southern and northern sections of the Great Barrier Reef), and
elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific (British Indian Ocean Territory [Chagos Banks, south of the Maldives],
Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand). I have also dived as part of a
research expedition to the Northwest Hawaiian Islands, the world’s largest marine protected area, on
the NOAA ship Hi’ialakai. I have rescue, NITROX, and master diver certifications through NAUI, as
well as AAUS training and certification from the University of Hawaii, Manoa. From April 2013 to
May 2015, I conducted fieldwork across the Indo-Pacific on the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans
Foundation’s research vessel, the Golden Shadow, and have logged over 600 dives across 10 nations
with this organization. More recently, I have been undertaking fieldwork at Dongsha, a Taiwanesegoverned
atoll in the South China Sea, with plans of going even further south into the South China Sea
(Nansha Atoll) in 2018. Since 2016, I have also been undertaking volunteer work (namely training
tourists in marine biology and establishing long-term monitoring programs) with the NGO Coral Reef
CPR in the Maldives, an opportunity that has afforded considerable diving.
In addition to having had the good fortune to have dived in so many spectacular locales, I
participated in hyperbaric physiology research while an undergraduate at Duke University. I was a test
subject in one of their “flying after diving” studies sponsored by the Diver’s Alert Network (which is
based at Duke University’s South Hospital). Briefly, we underwent dive and flight simulations in the
world’s premier hyperbaric chambers in order to determine whether flying after diving truly does result
in bubble formation in the blood. Although no one in our test group succumbed to decompression
sickness, I nevertheless do not recommend flying after diving until at least 12 hours have passed.

Hobbies/interests/likes
Asian food, backpacking, beaches, biking, blue crabs, camping, canoeing, cats, coffee, coral reefs,
Coral Triangle, craft beer, crawfish boils, Diet Coke, Duke basketball, exploring, fancy cheese, forests,
golden retrievers, Hawaii, heavy metal, hiking, hot chicken, international travel, karaoke, Latin
America, Mexico, molecular biology, mountains, national parks, NFL, photography, reading, ribs,
sashimi, science, SCUBA diving, spicy food, statistics, swamps, swimming, Taiwan, tacos, tubing